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Bobcat Blend

23 Jun

TexasRedWorms is proud to see what the students at Texas State have done with their Bobcat Blend project.  We are also proud to have had a small hand in providing worms for them years ago in their early stages.

Join us tomorrow at Rainbow Gardens in San Antonio

2 May

Join us for some fun talking about earthworms. Composting with worms Thousand Oaks

Top 5 reasons why Texas Jumpers are my favorite worm

30 Oct

happyworms

1.  Jumpers are easy to care for.  They can be bin raised just like other species (red worm and European nightcrawler). The added advantage to these worms is that they can and do thrive in ground set ups like raised beds or planters.

2.  Strength-  These fellas can handle tougher soil types like clay and sand better than other worms.  This strength makes them the only candidate most worm farmers would dare add directly to the garden.

clayworm2

3. They can take the heat.  In Texas I have to keep my reds and euros cool in the summer and sometimes a shady spot just isn’t cool enough.  They prefer the A/C and sometimes that is not an option.  My Jumpers are mainly kept in raised beds in the shade. With temps over 100 degrees F throughout the summer, Jumpers continue to reproduce when other worms shut down.

4.  Versatile-  Their strength and tolerance to heat make them more suitable for hotter summers.  Jumpers ability to be outside in raised beds or bins gives you the flexibility to try all sorts of set ups with greater success.

wormbed

5.  Performance-  Over my years of raising Texas Jumpers they have endured through some cold winters (for Texas) and some hot/dry summers.  Although the spring and fall can yield loads of eggs from the red worms and European nightcrawlers, the entire year production champion (in my experience) is the Jumper.

We need some new Texas Red Worm hats.

27 Jun

TRWhat

Thanks to James for sharing a pic all the way from Alaska with his well broke in Texas Red Worms hat.  We are trying to get some more made and hope to have them available soon.  Looking good James.

hat2

Good ‘ol Days

27 Jun

goodoldays

Oh the good ‘ol days when a couple of dimes would get you something.  Unfortunately we can’t give you this deal, but we’ve got some great Jumpers, Euros, and Red worms available for your fishing trip or enhancing your soil.   Thanks to Uncle Corky and Sheryl for sending this great picture they found.

 

Customer spotlight: Payne Handmade Knives

29 Apr

One of the best things about worm farming is the people I get to meet.  Walter Payne brought me this beautiful handmade knife today.   I just have to find a way to keep my dad from stealing it from me.

payneknife

For more information about knives contact:  Walter Payne wpayne@gvtc.com 830-336-2675 or 210-215-1859

If you want to contact TexasRedWorms  call Kyle at 210-310-5046.

payneknife2

How to keep your nightcrawlers from “nightcrawling” out of your bin

4 Mar

When you start a new European nightcrawler bin, these little fellas will do just as their name suggests and night crawl all over the place.  On several occasions I have woken up to worms out of the bin.   There is a simple little trick you can use that will help them stay put. Place a lamp or light source above the bin at night and they will be good girls/boys and “stay”.  After a few days, maybe a week or so they will get settled into their new home and be “trained” to stay put.

photo

Pallet Compost Bin

26 Feb

Wood Pallet Composter

Check out this link to see how to make a compost bin out of pallets.  Pallets can usually be acquired for free and make a great bin for breaking down your organic matter before feeding your worms or your plants.

 

 

Texas Red Worms will be at the Men’s Garden Club of San Antonio tonight 7pm

6 Feb

We’ll be talking about how to get started composting with Red Worms and how to keep warm!

http://mensgardenclubsa.com/index.html

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Red Mites and Red Worms

16 Jul
Red Mites killing a red worm

Red Mites killing a red worm

Red mites on watermelon rind.

Red mites on watermelon rind.

I’ve encountered these red devils before but not at this level.  Unlike most visitors in your worm bin, these guys are parasites to worms.  (see top picture).  Red mites flourish and can become a problem in a bin that is too moist, has too much food, or too acidic.  Don’t panic if you have a few mites, but a bin that is has been neglected and unkept in these conditions can pose a problem.  My outbreak was caused by overfeeding before we headed out for our July 4th vacation, and was left to fester for more than a week.  Getting rid of a red mite infestation can be a challenge.

I’ve tried several methods and have shown below a little experiment I began today.  I scraped the top of some red mite infected bins and partially filled some small shoebox containers.  From Left to Right in pic below 1. control 2. diatomaceous earth 3. watermelon rind 4. agricultural lime.

1. The control bin will be left open and scraped from time to time to see how long it takes to get rid of the red mites.

2. Diatomaceous Earth has been applied to top of #2.  DE needs to be kept dry in order for it to stick to bugs and make tiny cuts that will dry them out and kill them off.

3. Watermelon rind placed on top to attract red mites and discard.  I will replace with a new one and repeat and see how this does.

4. Ag Lime dusted on top.  Ag lime is alkaline and will hopefully bring the acidic bedding closer to neutral.  The high alkalinity concentrated on the top should burn up the red mites and not harm the worms.

4 methods for getting rid of red mites

These methods have been used before and should all work.  I just kind of wanted to see them head to head.  We’ll see how this turns out.  The good news is most of the red mites have been dismissed without harming too many of my bins and worms.  Additionally, I learned a valuable lesson about overfeeding, and next time I’ll use more composted manure and less of my worm chow mix.  My mistakes were 1. overfeeding 2. too wet 3. too much peat moss and too little composted manure (which made my bedding a little acidic) 4. My infected bins were unattended for a week.  Had I caught them sooner it wouldn’t have been much of an issue.