Tag Archives: worm castings

Join Dr. Jerry Parsons, TexasRedWorms, and the Garden Volunteers of South Texas Jan. 23.

23 Jan

The Garden Volunteers of South Texas will be hosting their monthly “Essentials of Gardening”  from 12:15 – 3 PM tomorrow at the San Antonio Garden Center (3310 N. New Braunfels at Funston, next to the Botanical Garden.)  Dr. Jerry Parsons will be speaking first on year round garden planning.  I will follow him w/ a worm composting presentation.  Admission is free but a $5 donation is encouraged.  Come join us!

Harvesting Worm Castings w/ a Homemade Sifter

23 Mar

For large jobs of sifting worms from castings or compost I use my Texas Worm Harvester, but for smaller jobs I have built a small box sifter.  With some scrap materials,  and the left over 1/4 inch wire mesh I had I put together this sifter.  I have also seen where other worm farmers use 1/8 inch screen, for my use I have found the 1/4 inch to do just fine.  Separating worms from castings using this or the harvester method is the first step I take and removes most of the worms are course unprocessed organic matter.  I do spend time picking out tiny worms and eggs, but losing a few is not a big deal.  Here is a picture of a tiny hatchling that I found while harvesting castings.  As you can see, or maybe not, these little guys are hard to find.  This little thread of a worm was wiggling which made him easier to see.

Worm Castings: the Best Fertilizer for the Garden

16 Mar

Spring time means it’s time to plant.  The whole family pitched in helping my parents with the garden. My niece and dad are pictured above planting the watermelons.  I supplied the worm castings, and a little hoeing to help out.

Worm castings are one of the benefits to raising your own worms.  Composting food waste with worms will give you your own organic fertilizer.  All natural fertilizer that strengthens roots of plants, improve disease resistance, and makes better tasting vegetables.  Check out these links for additional information and benefits from gardening with worm castings.

wormcompostingblog.com

wormsetc.com

tastefulgarden.com

We’ll be looking forward to some more tasty vegetables from the garden this year.

Planting Blueberries w/ worm castings

19 Jan

I just received my blueberry shipment yesterday, and was anxious to plant.  I ordered 14 blueberry 2-3 foot tall plants (climax, premier, brightwell, and delight varieties).   Blueberries like a little acidity and do very well in the southeast Texas well drained sandy soil.  We will put most of the plants in the ground in Livingston, but  I wanted to have a couple here in San Antonio in pots.

My blueberry potting mix: Sandy southeast Texas soil, peat moss, worm castings, and finished compost.

For the two plants I split 4 lbs of Texas red worm castings that I placed near the roots, not mixed like the other components.  Worm castings are an outstanding fertilizer to support root growth and development.

These plants should produce a few berries early this Summer, but we will pick them early to yeild a better crop in the second year.

I chose a large container, and repurposed an empty syrup tub that we use to feed cows.

Best Meyer Lemons yet w/ Worm Castings

8 Jan

Better yields, better tasting fruits and vegetables are the result when you fertilize w/ red worm castings. Worm castings contain loads of calcium, phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium.  Other micro and macro nutrients are present that support and develop superior root structure, to plants fertilized w/ commercial fertilizer.  Even though highly concentrated, worm castings will never burn plants like synthetic fertilizers can.  Benefits of fertilizing with worm castings include healthier plants, healthier fruits and vegetables, and cost savings.