Tag Archives: raising Alabama Jumpers

Jumper Starter Farm

18 Oct

(Insert your favorite state- Alabama, Texas, Carolina, Georgia) Jumpers are great for mixing and aerating garden soil.  The only commercially available earthworm that is suited for introducing directly to the soil.  Some soil types and raised beds with an abundance of organic matter can potentially support red worms and European NightCrawlers, but if you are dealing with sand, clay, or packed ground Jumpers are the only option.  With that said,  I still recommend raised beds or pit method to get your herd started rather than just cutting them loose.  If you want to populate your yard or garden start with a sweet spotand introduce them a handful or two at a time to other parts of your space.

Jumpers can also be raised in bins just like other species, and I have had a lot of success with this method.   Jumpers tolerate the Summer temps better than red worms but don’t handle sub 40F as well.  Keep in mind all earthworms are composters, will surface to feed and breed.  While earthworms share these characteristics, what makes them differ is their ability and need to tunnel, the range at which they operate, and temperature tolerance.

Jumper starter farm

I have included a couple of pictures of one of our Jumper Starter Farms.  This is designed to ship and gives you a healthy way to start and takes the guess work out of starting from scratch.  We take a sample of our beds (bedding and a few hundred worms of different sizes) to give you a solid start and something you can replicate as your population grows.  When you see small worms and larger ones it’s a good indicator that you have a healthy happy environment that your worms are reproducing in.  Depending on your needs and what you are trying to do, you will want to experiment and introduce worms in your soil to see which methods work best for you.   I would encourage you to focus on one spot and expand a handful or two of worms and bedding at a time when you see your worms growing and reproducing  from there.

Bin Raised Jumpers

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Bin Raising Alabama Jumpers

9 Nov

Above is a pic of one of my Alabama Jumper bins.  Worms are feeding on my DIY Worm Chow and some pumpkin.

Alabama Jumpers are best suited for tunneling, aerating, and mixing the soil.  They can be raised in bins like your other composting worms (red worm and european nightcrawler).  I set my bins up with a few inches of clay soil on the bottom to make the worms comfortable and try to replicate their natural home.  Next, I add several inches of compost that will provide the organic matter they will feed on.  In a worm bed or bin the second generation will flourish if conditions are right (moisture and food).  Having been born in the environment worms will adapt much better from birth and be happy in their new home.  When introducing Alabama Jumpers into a new environment (bin or bed), start with an ample supply of the medium that you harvested them from to ensure a greater chance for success.

Alabama Jumpers in Texas

28 Mar

I have been experimenting for a little over a year with the Alabama Jumper, sometimes referred to as the Georgia Jumper, or in this case Texas Jumper. The scientific name of which being Amynthas agrestis.  Now that that’s out of the way, this Jumper isn’t even originally from Alabama?   As a matter of fact, it is believed to hail from Asia.  How about that?  This aggressive and super strong worm can and will jump right out of your hand.  This super strength makes it a powerful tunneler, and allows it to burrow through some of the hardest packed clay soil.  This worm is a hot item, and is in high demand by gardeners everywhere for these reasons.  European nightcrawlers, African nightcrawlers, and Red Worms, are all great, but the Alabama Jumper can go to work in clay and sand unlike the other varieties.  I have experienced it’s power first hand, and been amazed at it’s strength and ability to work through some hard soil.  In San Antonio, we’ve got some pretty tough clay, and I have seen these Jumpers perform mightily in it.  I too have read all the hype about this worm, and it is the real deal.  The Alabama Jumper is great for people that want a worm to go to work in their soil, garden, or flowerbeds.  For composting, producing castings, or fishing I would recommend the others.

I have been trying various methods of raising the Alabama Jumper for over a year, and have had success with raising them in bins, as well as, worm beds or pits.  They are reproducing in both environments, and I have a limited amount available for sale.  Call for availability.