Tag Archives: worm farming

Stock Tank Worm Bed

8 Nov

Screen Shot 2018-11-08 at 11.54.45 AM

One of the ways I raise my worms is in 100 gallon stock tanks.  My preference is to start with cinder blocks and a pallet on top of that.   This elevates and makes for less bending over when feeding or harvesting.  The lid doesn’t have to be elaborate and can be a piece of plywood laid over the top of your bin.  For a lid like the one pictured, you will want to use the metal instead of the plastic version.  The reason- heat is trapped by the plastic  and raises the temps in the hotter months.  The metal does a far better job of reflecting the heat.  There are lots of ways to skin this cat and I encourage you to put you own spin on it.  Look for things you have access to already and use what you already have laying around.  You’ll be surprised what you can turn into a worm bed.imageStock Tank Worm Bed

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Rainbow Gardens “OPENING UP MY OWN CAN OF WORMS.”

10 Jun

Thanks to Lisa, Laura, and Rainbow Gardens.  Check out “Opening up my own can of worms”.

Bin Raising Alabama Jumpers

9 Nov

Above is a pic of one of my Alabama Jumper bins.  Worms are feeding on my DIY Worm Chow and some pumpkin.

Alabama Jumpers are best suited for tunneling, aerating, and mixing the soil.  They can be raised in bins like your other composting worms (red worm and european nightcrawler).  I set my bins up with a few inches of clay soil on the bottom to make the worms comfortable and try to replicate their natural home.  Next, I add several inches of compost that will provide the organic matter they will feed on.  In a worm bed or bin the second generation will flourish if conditions are right (moisture and food).  Having been born in the environment worms will adapt much better from birth and be happy in their new home.  When introducing Alabama Jumpers into a new environment (bin or bed), start with an ample supply of the medium that you harvested them from to ensure a greater chance for success.

DIY Worm Trough

28 Apr

I had been thinking of building a feed trough style worm bed for some time.  I found some plastic 55 gallon drums on Craigslist.  My dad had some pine 2X4s cut from his saw mill, and we were in business.  We began by cutting the 55 gallon plastic drums in half w/ a skill saw.

Materials: (2X4s, plastic 55 gallon drums, 3 inch wood screws, roofing screws, Thompson’s water seal)

Next we cut the 2X4s to border the open 1/2 end of the drum.  We used 3″ screws to piece the wood together, and galvanized roofing screws to secure the barrel to frame.  The height off the ground, we sized to about waist high for ease of use and for clearance underneath.
We had enough time and materials to build 3 bins.  When finished, I sprayed some wood preservative on the untreated pine, then I added compost and worms.  These bins are kept in a shaded area, and covered with plastic lids.  I set up a bin for each species we raise (Alabama Jumpers, Red Worms, European Nightcrawlers)
Thanks to my dad (pictured) for the pine, and skilled labor.