Tag Archives: compost

Harvesting Worm Castings w/ a Homemade Sifter

23 Mar

For large jobs of sifting worms from castings or compost I use my Texas Worm Harvester, but for smaller jobs I have built a small box sifter.  With some scrap materials,  and the left over 1/4 inch wire mesh I had I put together this sifter.  I have also seen where other worm farmers use 1/8 inch screen, for my use I have found the 1/4 inch to do just fine.  Separating worms from castings using this or the harvester method is the first step I take and removes most of the worms are course unprocessed organic matter.  I do spend time picking out tiny worms and eggs, but losing a few is not a big deal.  Here is a picture of a tiny hatchling that I found while harvesting castings.  As you can see, or maybe not, these little guys are hard to find.  This little thread of a worm was wiggling which made him easier to see.

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Compost Tea Time

18 Mar

This afternoon I began brewing up about 70 gallons of compost tea with worm castings I recently harvested.  In about 12 hours my brew will be ready to apply to my plants and yard.  If you are in the San Antonio area, and can pick up, I’ll be giving a gallon of actively aerated vermicompost tea away with a TexasRedWorm.com purchase.  An application of compost tea will add life to your soil with beneficial micro organisms that will fight disease and pests, as well as, boost your plants growth.  Active aeration prevents harmful anaerobic bacteria and other non-beneficial microbial activity.  Applying compost tea within a few hours is best, after a few hours the brew begins to go anearobic.

Here’s a link for a recipe.

Be aware of store bought compost tea products claims that are sitting on the shelf.  These products will not be aerobic and will not contain many of the benefits (beneficial microbes that require Oxygen) that are associated with actively aerated compost tea.

Texas Worm Harvester (part 4)

10 Mar

After several weeks and hundreds of pounds, I have made a few modifications to my worm harvester.  The first thing I did was replace the 1/2 inch hardware cloth w/ 1/4 inch screen throughout.  The 1/4 inch screen keeps the majority of the worms out of the catch tubs and sends most worms to the end bucket along w/ the larger sized material.  I still have to spend some time picking through the worm castings for eggs and baby worms.  Using this method I have been able to speed up the process of separating worms from castings considerably.

Another change I made was adding a scrap piece of particle board to the front end to make loading easier and to prevent back flow.  The only other modification was to tweak the angle slightly.  I have the end pieces bolted so that I can adjust the height, also I can add blocks underneath to change the level.

Texas Worm Harvester (part 3)

8 Feb

The sun was shining and the arctic blast of 2011 broke this weekend for the first run of the Texas Worm Harvester.  I ran a couple hundred pounds of compost through the rig and had some good results.  I had enough time to run a few of my red worm bins with the same success.  I put together a fairly rough video of the project, and welcome any questions.  Let me know if I can help you with your very own version.

Planting Blueberries w/ worm castings

19 Jan

I just received my blueberry shipment yesterday, and was anxious to plant.  I ordered 14 blueberry 2-3 foot tall plants (climax, premier, brightwell, and delight varieties).   Blueberries like a little acidity and do very well in the southeast Texas well drained sandy soil.  We will put most of the plants in the ground in Livingston, but  I wanted to have a couple here in San Antonio in pots.

My blueberry potting mix: Sandy southeast Texas soil, peat moss, worm castings, and finished compost.

For the two plants I split 4 lbs of Texas red worm castings that I placed near the roots, not mixed like the other components.  Worm castings are an outstanding fertilizer to support root growth and development.

These plants should produce a few berries early this Summer, but we will pick them early to yeild a better crop in the second year.

I chose a large container, and repurposed an empty syrup tub that we use to feed cows.

10 red worm egg experiment

3 Dec

 

Last week, as an experiment  I stocked  a starter bin with bedding and 10 red worm cocoons or egg sacs.  I would love to be able to see the little rascals hatch, but as you will see in the next post, counting these little critters can be pretty difficult.  Stay tuned.

Perfect time for Red Worming (Vermicomposting)

12 Nov

It’s always the right time to add compost to your soil, and always a great time to get started composting with Red Worms.  It’s Fall in Texas and the cooler weather is ideal for work outside and setting up your worm bed.

TexasRedWorms.com provides you the easiest way to start composting with Red Worms (vermicomposting) today.  Our shoebox sized Starter Farm provides everything you need to produce nutrient rich castings for your plants and soil, and a thriving breeding brood of red worms (eisenia foetida) nature’s best composter.

Check out our latest ad on Craigslist or just give us a call 210-310-5046.  If you are in the San Antonio or Livingston, TX area pick up can be arranged, or call for shipping information.